Georgia Democrat Floats Absurd Conspiracy Theory About Biden Document Scandal: ‘Things Can Be Planted’

Democrat Georgia Representative Hank Johnson, who is known for the ridiculous suggestion that overpopulation could cause the island Guam to “tip over and capsize,” made another absurd suggestion on Thursday in discussion of the classified documents that were found at President Biden’s home. 

Johnson made the remarks when asked by a reporter about the scandal, suggesting that the classified documents had been “planted” at Biden’s residence. 

“My response to it all is that alleged classified documents showing up allegedly in the possession of Joseph Biden, you know, I mean, there’s so much that needs to be investigated,” Johnson said. “And that’s, that’s what I called for is for everything to be investigated, but I’m suspicious of the timing of it.”

“I’m also aware of the fact that things can be planted on people, places and things can be planted, things can be planted in places and then discovered conveniently, that may be what has occurred here,” he claimed. “I’m not ruling that out.”

“But I don’t, I’m open in terms of the investigation needs to be investigated,” Johnson added.

Rep. Johnson is infamous for his comments during a House Armed Services Committee hearing held in March 2010 during which the committee discussed a proposal to move 8,000 from the Japanese island of Okinawa to the U.S. Pacific island territory of Guam. During the hearing, Johnson expressed concern that significantly increasing the population of Guam might cause the small island to “tip over and capsize.” 

“[Guam is a] very small island, about twenty-four miles, if I recall, long, twenty-four miles long, about seven miles wide at the least widest place on the island and about twelve miles wide on the widest part of the island, and I don’t know how many square miles that is,” Johnson began. 

“My fear is that the whole island will become so overly populated that it will tip over and capsize,” Johnson added.

D & B Staff

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